This is a social network map of agents involved in the global warming "debate"  

Most important actors are in RED CAPS, then lower case red, then green, then yellow.

Color coding of link relationships is just starting, but essential money is green, support is purple, and antagonism is red.

You can also sort by tags (small white terms to right on node name) by searching for them:  Uber are most important, pioneers are early, Mod is moderating/balancing feedback etc
 


 

 Note: if you get an EditLive fail on content, you can access by File tab to

 Open in Browser

 book chapter (quite rough overview):

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KPtJMUbEUSFq5HtTvcid7rYTmKVohOR27hcj6jZBoKE/edit

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TODO:

effective agents
 

crisis mgmt


 

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3/28/14 bk dnstr 4685, 34.6K connections

 

1/25/14 bk to leno/usb?

12/13 4,349  32,345 links
 

11/13 4,219 nodes 31.5 K links, 3276 notes, 123 tags

8/27/13 recover uscoc2 4001
 

8/20 to F 3,956
 

8/6/13 3,859, 28,541

 

7/18/13 3,711, 27, 313  zip q
 

70 kilobyte webodecM 6/14/13 on F

 7/13 3,457 26,144 links  bkup to f, oh
 

6/13 3331

3165
 

 3,125 nodes, 21,781 conns, backed up to f drive 4/5/13
 

2660 nodes, 16K links 9/12 2,932 2/1/13

archive zip 9/10/12

2,968 archive 213 2/16/13  zip 

3/23/13 zip 313 3,034 20K links

3,057

2100

zip 4/26/13 f drive webodec3g
 

 RESEARCH TOOLS (see also funder)

 

http://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/ navigator for ngo

great resource:  http://investigativereportingworkshop.org/investigations/

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http://66.39.128.35/index.php/Help:How_to_research_U.S._corporations

 

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http://www.opencongress.org/people/bills/412567_Jim_Bridenstine  gives voted with and ~ most

 

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/climate-change/

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see social networks node, as well as Wheregoodideas.txt:


 

Ruef at Stanford found that creative ppl have broad network diverse 166 // Ron Burt found innovation in ppl who bridge "structural holes" between tightly knot clusters 167 (U of Chic studying RAytheon! Chapter 7 The Social Capital of Structural Holes Ronald S. Burt
faculty.chicagobooth.edu/ronald.burt/research/files/scsh.pdf

Structural Holes and Good Ideas
www.econ.upf.edu/docs/seminars/burt.pdf


 

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The Network of Global Corporate Control

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0025995
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A University of Zurich study 'proves' that a small group of companies - mainly banks - wields huge power over the global economy.
 

The study is the first to look at all 43,060 transnational corporations and the web of ownership between them - and created a 'map' of 1,318 companies at the heart of the global economy.
 

The study found that 147 companies formed a 'super entity' within this, controlling 40 per cent of its  wealth. All own part or all of one another. Most are banks - the top 20 includes Barclays and Goldman Sachs. But the close connections mean that the network could be vulnerable to collapse.
economy

'In effect, less than one per cent of the companies were able to control 40 per cent of the entire network,' says James Glattfelder, a complex systems theorist at the Swiss Federal Institute in Zurich, who co-wrote the research, to be published in the journal PLoS One.
 

Some of the assumptions underlying the study have come in for criticism - such as the idea that ownership equates to control. But the Swiss researchers have no axe to grind: they simply applied mathematical models usually used to model natural systems to the world economy, using data from Orbis 2007, a database listing 37 million companies and investors.
 

Economists such as John Driffil of the University of London, a macroeconomics expert, told New Scientist that the value of its study wasn't to see who controlled the global economy, but the tight connections between the world's largest companies.
 

The financial collapse of 2008 showed that such tightly-knit networks can be unstable.

'If one company suffers distress,' Glattfelder says, 'This propagates.'
 

The research requires more analysis, but it could be used to look for the weaknesses in the network of global wealth, and prevent future financial disaster.
 

Looking at 'connectedness' also puts paid to conspiracy theories about the world's wealth - companies connect to highly connected companies for business reasons, rather than world domination.

The 'core' of 147 companies also represents too many interests to wield real political power - but it could act 'as one' to defend common interests. Sadly for market reformers, resisting change may be one such common interest.
 

Click here to read more.
 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2051008/Does-super-corporation-run-global-economy.html
 

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RESOURCES

 http://www.citizensforethics.org/scandals-and-scoundrels

ccrept: http://climatechange.carboncapturereport.org/  hmn, aggregator

 

http://maplight.org/

 

http://staging.influenceexplorer.com/

 

RIP namebase

 

http://littlesis.org/lists

 

http://www.namebase.org/cgi-bin/nb01?Na=Dulles,+Allen+W.

 

http://www.dkosopedia.com/wiki/Biographies#Righties

 

http://www.dkosopedia.com/wiki/Main_Page

 

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http://wikiality.wikia.com/Halliburton

 

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http://www.rightweb.irc-online.org/

 

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http://www.antifascistencyclopedia.com/tag/bass-family

 

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http://voices.washingtonpost.com/right-now/2010/04/welcome_to_right_now.html

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http://watchdog.net/p/richard_nixon

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http://www.publicintegrity.org/

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http://watchdog.net/p/richard_nixon

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http://web.archive.org/web/20030608085117/www.publiceye.org/b-direct.html

 

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WRA

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The Power Elite

Now that the upper class, corporate community, and policy-planning network have been defined and described, it is possible to discuss the leadership group that I call the "power elite." I define the power elite as the leadership group of the upper class. It consists of active-working members of the upper class and high-level employees in profit and nonprofit institutions controlled by members of the upper class through stock ownership, financial support, or involvement on the board of directors. This does not mean that all members of the upper class are involved in governing. Some are only playboys and socialites; their social gatherings may provide a setting where members of the power elite mingle with celebrities, and sometimes they give money to political candidates, but that is about as close as they come to political power.

Conversely, not all those involved in the power elite are members of the upper class. They are sons and daughters of the middle class, and occasionally, the blue-collar working class, who do well at any one of several hundred private and state universities, and then go to grad school, MBA school, or law school at one of a handful of elite universities -- e.g., Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Columbia, MIT, Johns Hopkins, University of Chicago, and Stanford. From there they go to work for a major corporation, law firm, foundation, think tank, or university, and slowly work their way to the top.

The idea of the power elite intertwines class theory and organizational theory, two theories which are often thought of as distinctive or even as rivals. The basis for the intertwining of the two theories is to be found in the role and composition of the boards of directors that govern every large profit and nonprofit organization in the United States. It is on boards of directors that the values and goals of the upper class are integrated with those of the organizational hierarchy. Upper-class directors insure that their interests are infused into the organizations they control, but the day-to-day organizational leaders on the board are able to harmonize class interests with organizational principles.

It is important to stress that I am not saying that all experts are members of the power elite. People have to be high-level employees in institutions controlled by members of the upper class to be considered part of the power elite. Receiving a fellowship from a foundation, spending a year at a think tank, or giving advice to a policy-discussion organization does not make a person a member of the power elite. It also may be useful to note that there are many experts who never go near the policy-planning network. They focus on their teaching and research, or work for groups that oppose the policies of the power elite. In short, experts and advisers are a separate group just below the power elite in the pecking order.

 
 

With the composition of the power elite clearly stated, it is now possible to show how it dominates the federal government in the interest of the upper class and corporate community.

The Power Elite and Government

Members of the power elite directly involve themselves in the federal government through three basic processes, each of which has a slightly different role in ensuring "access" to the White House, Congress, and specific agencies, departments, and committees in the executive branch. Although some of the same people are involved in all three processes, most leaders specialize in one or two of the three processes. These three processes are:

  1. The special-interest process, through which specific families, corporations, and industrial sectors are able to realize their narrow and short-run interests on taxes, subsidies, and regulation in their dealings with congressional committees, regulatory bodies, and executive departments;
  2. The policy-making process, through which the policies developed in the policy-planning network described earlier are brought to the White House and Congress;
  3. The candidate selection process, through which members of the power elite influence electoral campaigns by means of campaign donations to political candidates.

Power elite domination of the federal government can be seen most directly in the workings of the corporate lobbyists, backroom super-lawyers, and industry-wide trade associations that represent the interests of specific corporations or business sectors. This special-interest process is based in varying combinations of information, gifts, insider dealing, friendship, and, not least, promises of lucrative private jobs in the future for compliant government officials. This is the aspect of business-government relations described by journalists and social scientists in their case studies. While these studies show that the special interests usually get their way, the conflict that sometimes erupts within this process, occasionally pitting one corporate sector against another, reinforces the image of widely shared and fragmented power in America, including the image of a divided corporate community. Moreover, there are some defeats suffered by the corporate rich in the special-interest process. For example, laws that improved auto safety standards were passed over automobile industry objections in the 1970s, as were standards of water cleanliness opposed by the paper and chemical industries.

 

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The Organization of Denial: Conservative Think Tanks and Environmental Scepticism

 

 

Co-authored with Riley E. Dunlap and Mark Freeman published in the journal Environmental Politics, June 2008

 

 

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history

 

Center for Study of Popular Culture: $2.8 million 36 annual budget

Media Research Center: $6 million annual budget

Accuracy in the Media: $1.3 million annual budget

Center for Media and Public Affairs: $1 million annual budget


 

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      Resources for studying the right-wing movement:
        Right Wing Research Center [140], People for the American Way Foundation

        Media Transparency [141], The Money Behind the Media

        Resources For Studying Right-Wing Funding & Policy-Making [142], Public Eye

    ��   Greenwash [143], Clary-Meuser Research Network

        An Internet Guide to Power Structure Research [144],

        Theocracy Watch [145],

        Center for Media and Democracy [146]

 ��      SourceWatch [147]

        Right Web [148],

            "Right Web explores the many ties that link the right-wing movement's main players, organizations, corporate supporters, educational institutions, and government representatives to each other in a new architecture of power."


 

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amazing commonweal biblio:

 

Conservative Movement